Quavo Reflects On Saweetie Elevator Fight Video, Talks State Of Migos

The content originally appeared on: Urban Islandz

Fans are finally getting a look into what might have happened to cause the split between Quavo and Saweetie, even though it has been prompted by the 2020 footage of the couple seemingly having a fight in an elevator.

The “Walk It, Talk It” rapper has also admitted that he’s not happy about how things ended up between the two. He made the revelations while being interviewed by GQ. The Migos rapper also opened up about his current love life and the lessons that he learned with Saweetie.

He took the opportunity to let fans and critics know that he never wants to harm women in any way, including physically. Even if that is the case, the video is pretty damning as the two seem to have a heated argument in which the “My Type” rapper is seen throwing an object at Quavo’s head.

The object misses, and then he drags her into the elevator, after which they struggle over a suitcase, and she falls to the ground.

“I don’t like what people think. When they saw the elevator thing they thought it was abusive, something crazy,” he added later on.

It seems that the lesson has been learned as he also admitted that he has not jumped into another relationship just yet as he is seeking to work on himself. He added that his main focus right now was to establish himself as a human being before he got involved in any more relationships.

The two officially began dating in September 2018 and were often in the limelight as fans constantly reposted clips of them together and some of the special moments that they shared, but Saweetie confirmed that they had broken up in March 2021.

In the same interview with GQ, Quavo opened up about the status of Migos amid recent rumors of the group splitting up with himself and Takeoff forming a duo, and Offset left hanging. There are also rumored tension between Quavo, Takeoff and Offset’s wife, Cardi B.

Quavo is saying that doing music separately will only help the group as a collective in the long run.

“It was all about Migos, Migos, Migos. The three of us,” the Atlanta rapper said about Migos dominance as a group in the 2010s. “I feel like every group member has to establish themselves. Their own body of work. If not, you start losing members.”